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it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
labs are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project
are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the li
, mathematics and science and you have a new book called "why does the world exist: an existential detective story." >> you say that sarcastically. (laughter) >> stephen: that's as sincere as i get. (laughter) first question: why does world exist exist? (laughter) what led you to write this book? >> good question. i was raised in a very religious family. >> stephen: what kind? >> catholic. >> stephen: how religious were you? >> i said the rosary. i did--. >> stephen: basic stuff, basic stuff. >> i confessed my sins. >> stephen: are you still catholic? >> no. >> stephen: well then how religious could your family have been? evidently they failed. >> yeah, they told me this story that the world exists because god--. >> stephen: in the beginning. >> exactly. there's already a book about that, by the way. (laughter) so you listened and then at some point you said i don't buy it. >> i began to have doubts and i want to know why the universe exists. if there's a reason i want to know that and god might be the reason, you may believe that but you know,--. >> stephen: you should care about this myste
-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> guest: it is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all around me. the book is really people who are trying to change the world in trying to ban progress, but he don't completely fit the existing models that we have between the left in the right or democrats and republicans. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve ca
that that dollar is wisely spent. i think they stand for civil rights. i know they're all for education in science and training, which i strongly support. they want these young people to have a chance to get jobs and the rest. i think the business community wants to get involved. i think they're asking for new and creative ways to try to reach it with everyone involved. i think that's part of it. i think also that the american people want a balanced program that gives us long-term growth so that they're not having to take money that's desperate to themselves and their families and give it to someone else. i'm opposed to that, too. >> and now it is time for our rebuttal for this period. mr. president? >> yes. the connection that's been made again between the deficit and the interest rates -- there is no connection between them. there is a connection between interest rates and inflation, but i would call to your attention that in 1981 while we were operating still on the carter-mondale budget that we inherited -- that the interest rates came down from 211/2, down toward the 12 or 13 figure. and whil
the change for winter 2012. >> it's kind of a science. >> jummy the -- you meet the man behind "wicked" and how they turn the stage into >> discussion impossible tax hike under way and the impact could have on middle-class families. a man dies in police custody and is now being rolled homicide. allegations of illegal gambling and internet cafes. details on the claims being made by the maryl >> the weather channel will begin naming not or the winter storms this upcoming winter season to better communicate the threat and timing of a significant storms' impact. instead of calling things snow- tober or snopocalypse. the list includes athena, brutus, draco, and magnus. >> the most important things to look out will be accumulation and the combination of wind which can produce significant impact on the public. listen differentiate -- this will differentiate the system they will be using. tom tasselmyer? >> "bob's on teh way." we start talking about snowstorms three weeks in advance. >> brutus is coming! >> e tu? [laughter] >> pretty soon we will be naming rain storms. i don't know. >> we will
and secondary level with science education. liz: how do we get people to be interested in science and engineering? >> it takes good curriculum, good teachers and good schools. as we all know, teachers can make all the difference in turning on student curiosity. it really takes a whole number of things to really come together. liz: how to look at what is happening today? unemployment dropped to 7.8%. on the surface, it looks good, some people question it. what do you see out there in the trenches as a business leader? >> well, in all honesty, there are a lot of people who are unemployed, there are actually quite a few who are underemployed. there is no question the economy is not creating as many good, solid high-paying jobs. liz: they always ask business people what the problem is and they say uncertainty. >> i do not think it is as much uncertainty. you have to have an increase in demand of your products that justify the need for more manufacturing, more employees and there is a point in fact for us in 2012 our volume is less than it was last year. there is not a lot of justifica
to believe that science reduces humanity, that science gives you a bleak, cold, empty, barren view of the universe and of life. quite the contrary. science is enriching and fulfilling. what's going to happen when i die? if i met god, the unlikely event after i died, i think the first thing i would say is which one are you? are you zeuss, are you thor? which god are you? why did you take such great pains to conceal yourself and hide away from us. >> and you can see more fascinating interviews like this one online at our website, go to cnn.com/video and search red chair. up next, a story involving yard sales, a space launch and bobble head of president obama. can you figure it out? now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of american
in 2010 and not so well in 2008. clinton said this is not rocket science, that what republicans want to do is they want to make the 2012 electorate look more like the 2010 electorate and the 2008 electorate. and clinton said he had never seen in his lifetime an effort to restrict the franchise that he has seen today. clinton grew up in arkansas. he knows what this kind of politics is about. he was there. he knew people there during segregation. i think for him it is a very, very disturbing to be going back to such a place, to be having the kind of conversations we are having now that you would have before the civil rights act of 1964 was passed and before the voting rights act. . tavis: is this a short-term strategy or long term? is this a strategy to get rid of barack obama, the first african american president? or is this a strategy they think it can win long-term for them, the strategy of voter suppression? >> i think they are playing a short-term game. it is not just about president obama but holding power every level of the electoral process. but i think what they are betting now is t
classes in advance science and math and one day you will know her as dr. dan yes. >> medicine has always been in the family. >> it was her dad that made the biggest difference. he told her to visit haiti. she collected balls, cleats, jerseys and went over there packed with good feelings. >> soccer was something that was really important to them even though they didn't have the nicest cleats or the nicest equipment but they -- they felt really good after we gave them stuff and we felt better. >> what did she learn? >> appreciate a lot more that iv. >> what we have here is a star. on and off the field. congratulations to the first belaire honda student athlete of the week. >> great story. >> great if you know an outstanding student like that who you think should be the high school student athlete of the week head to the website right now, click on the link on the right hand received the page to submit your nomination. >> great story. >> coming up tonight after world news you have to check out the show the list. here is a sneak peek of what they are working on for you tonight. >>
... political science rofessor... debate... is so critiial./.. ccndidates. (kromer) "at this point in time, it's obama's toolose, so romney's behhnd in the polls, he's behind in a lot of he majoo swing states that republicans have to win likk ohio to win the presidency. he nneds to come out, anddromney needs to demonstrate that e can clearly articulate his during the first presidential debate tomorrow night, some experts will be busy analyzing the body lannuage of the two during the presidential debate wednesday night, university of maryland rofeesor karen bradley will watch in silence. she's been studying the &pmovements of the politicians movement analyst... she sttdies he non verbal behaviors of olitical peaders. bradlee has this advise for the two presidential contenders. (on romney)"i would reaaly work with mitt rommey onn breathing.. and becoming more grounded in his body so he actually taaes aastaad and doesn't do that ssifting"(on bbrrack obama ((buttttoo)) he has a strange phrasing takes strange pauses.. " " the debate takes place tomorroo night in denver live it...
the first human rabies death in 20 years. our health and science center tells us how a single bat could have put dozens of people all over the world at risk. >>> it happened somewhere in south contracosta county. colonies of mexican free tail bats.. >> once symptoms develop it's fatal. >> after a bite the incubation phase is 2 to 6 months. >> the unidentified 34-year-old man was outside with friends who had found a bat quote flopping on the ground. one of them had the bat in a plastic bag. >> the i can't who died of rabys went over and stuck his hand in the bag and most likely was bitten. . >> he never reported the bite in march. took civilian work in iraq and became infectious. he flew home to kran traffic costa june 14th. four days later to bangkok for vacation. flew back to work in iraq. worsened. flew to dubai for treatment . >> there were 59 people who were identified and 23 of those people internationally received post exposure. >> the man's family also got shots. they urge people to avoid all contact with wild animals acting usually and all bats. immediate treatment can save lives. he
details tonight about the first human rabies death in 20 years. our health and science center tells us how a single bat could have put dozens of people all over the world at risk. >>> it happened somewhere in south contracosta county. colonies of mexican free tail bats.. >> once symptoms develop it's fatal. >> after a bite the incubation phase is 2 to 6 months. >> the unidentified 34-year-old man was outside with friends who had found a bat quote flopping on the ground. one of them had the bat in a plastic bag. >> the i can't who died of rabys went over and stuck his hand in the bag and most likely was bitten. . >> he never reported the bite in march. took civilian work in iraq and became infectious. he flew home to kran traffic costa june 14th. four days later to bangkok for vacation. flew back to work in iraq. worsened. flew to dubai for treatment . >> there were 59 people who were identified and 23 of those people internationally received post exposure. >> the man's family also got shots. they urge people to avoid all contact with wild animals acting usually and all bats. immediate trea
that suspects will get convicted, but there is good forensic science and it is more likely that innocent people will not be convicted if there is good forensic science and that is what this lab is about. >> and the crime lab is an independent lab and not answering to the chief of police. >> tony williams said it was his vision that got the project off the ground. >> tomorrow marks ten years since the d.c. sniper attacks began during the 3 week spree. the two were captured and convicted. mohammed was executed and roberts is serving a sentence. we covered the story back then, paul, and is there anything that sticks out in your mind. >> the lind -- the murder of linda franklin. a lady going about her business at the home depot, outside with her husband. and then if you recall there was one person who came forward and said he saw the sniper and was lying. and that sends people wondering, what was going on here? it was just such a frightening time. >> i think i remember when this broke and no one knew what was going on, i was sent to the location in aspen hill and i remember in the days afterwards a
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "early start." an american astronaut about to hitch a ride with the russians up to the international space station. later this month, nasa's kevin ford will join two russian astronauts aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft that will blast them into orbit for a five-month stay. ford will join the station's current team and take over as expedition commander. this will mark for the second space flight and his first aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft. kevin ford is joining us live now from the cosmonaut training center in star city, russia, where he and his crewmates have been preparing for the mission. thank you for being with us. you will be at that time iss from the end of the month until march of next year. can you tell us what you will be doing while you are there? >> well, i can't tell you exactly what we will be doing but i can tell you what we plan to do. so we -- we hope to carry out a lot of science. we had a lot of trainin
baby. >> doing math with the gets? >> doing s.t.e.avenue. m. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overus
saying the therapies have quote, no basis in science or medicine. >>> a devastating new attack in afghanistan to talk about today. a suicide bomber killed 14 people including three american soldiers in the volatile eastern province of khost. it comes a day after the death toll in the 11-year-old war in afghanistan reached 2,000. but that number does not include the number of americans injured in afghanistan and who died when they were transferred elsewhere. which would then raise the total to over 2100. nbc news has special coverage today across the middle east. lester holt joins us live now at the afghan capital of kabul. that number 2,000 representing only americans who died in afghanistan not those who were injured in the country. but didn't die until they were transported wrels. that's a big distinction. this is a major marker to reach now with the number of casualties. >> it is. and we've been talking about a number over 2100 for some time. 2,000 representing those who died here. but remember the aeromedical system is such a soldier could be wounded on the battlefield and
to come, cheeseburgers, fries, milk shakes in the name of science. >> why people are loading up on the fast food and getting paid amazing money to do it. it is all coming up. ♪ cheeseburger in paradise ♪ heaven on earth ♪ >> the next story either seems like a dream come true or a disaster waiting to happen. eating fast food, every day, and getting paid thousands to do it. >> big money here. all a new experiment conducted by doctors to measure exactly what fast food diets can do to you. abc's john donvan has the story. >> reporter: hitting the fast food drive-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos. two sausage burritos. >> reporter: over and over and over again. it has been dave's life the past three months or so as has been eating the food. a precisely measured, 1,000 calories a day, extra meal daily, fast food only. >> how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? this man is paying them to. dr. samuel klein a researcher at washington medical school in st. louis trying to understand why weight gain ladies to diseases like diabetes and hypertension and how that relate
signed the bill and said, quote, these have no basis in science or medicine. they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery. >> an oakland man is one of 23 winners so called genius grants and is a family independence initiative after a challenge from mayor jerry brown taking a different approach to help poor families instead of giving aid it helps them figure out their own paths towards self sufficient. >> we're looking at character loans so that if you don't meet other criteria, there are other criteria you can access low interest loan autos the family independence initiative helped about 800 families and he plans to use a portion of the $500,000 money to expand the program to other country autos coming up next, there is a big new layoff announcement from silicon valley. hundreds of people about to lose their job autos stage is set tonight for first presidential debate. and voting against underway. >> there is a progress report on the new bay bridge. the lock is run to opening day. stay with us. >>> good evening, there is a packed house tonight. emotions are really on edge. abc
of a books will look at science history, the cyberworld, popular culture, live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span 2. >> the bureau of labor statistics has announced the unemployment rate has dropped from 8.1% to 7.8% in september, the lowest level since january 2009. president obama spoken by the job picture at this venue at george mason university. it is about 30 minutes. >> hello, everybody! [cheers and applause] hello, george mason! hello, patriots! [cheers and applause] good to see you guys. thank you. thank you. [cheers and applause] thank you! thank you. thank you so much. thank you. [cheers and applause] thank you. everybody, have a seat. have a seat. thank you. well, it is good to be here. i am so proud to have katherine's support. can you give her a big round of applause for that great introduction. [applause] it's also good to know that we've got the former governor and next united states senator from the commonwealth of virginia, tim kaine! and your congressman, jerry conley. [cheers] and good to see all of you. so one month. just one month from tomorrow, virginia, you're goi
as a politicalf th science and journalism -- he pivoted to some of the positions that he explicitly set aside during the primaries, where he became truly one of the most -- there were others, rick santorum and newt gingrich -- extremist candidates on key issues that appeal to independents. when a pos -- one of the most interesting things in this election is the growing gender gap. you are too young, but many in 1992 called it the year of the woman, because of the showdown between anita hill and at then- being-confirmed justice clarence thomas. where were the women's voices? you had that sense when georgetown student center fluk -- sandra fluke was called to testify on contraception and it was an all-metal panel. -- all-male panel. would you imagine that in the 21st century that contraception would be raised as a polarizing issue, huerta taken -- where todd akin is talking about legitimate rate. that has led to the fact that independent women are alienated by these extremists. we're not talking about abortion, which i think is a right and should be in this country. we're talking about women's
. but us start the national academy of sciences. let us start colleges. because we want to give the gateways of -- date was of opportunities for all americans. all americans are getting opportunities, that enhances people's freedom. what i have tried to do as president is to apply those same principles. >> that is president obama from the debate this week on the role of government. let us listen to his challenger mitt romney with his answer. and then we will begin listening to you. [video clip] >> have a responsibility to and libertiesthe lives of the american people. in another one that says we are endowed by our creator with our rights, i believe we must maintain our commitment to religious tolerance and freedom in this country. the statement also says that we are endowed by our creator with the right to pursue happiness as we choose. i interpret that as one making sure that those people who are less fortunate that cannot care for themselves are cared for by one another. we are a nation of belize we are all children of the same god. and we care for those that have difficulties
-span, there would be blood in the streets. >> we're going to talk about neuro science >> reporter: in the end e-health's lobbying was successful in changing the rules. low-income americans will be allowed to use their subsidies to buy insurance on e-health. did you have to write a proposed regulation to hand them? >> we've written a lot. at the end of the day the regulation didn't use all of our language. that was fine. but it caught the essence of this. and it included some things that these people in health and human services thought were important which we agreed with. >> that was a good meeting i would say that the process here is far from elegant. the process here involves influence >> you guys still do a lot of military? >> democracy is a messy way of governing yourself. and there are imperfections that people vote for bills that they don't read. they vote for words that lobby i haves have written. but it is the system that's better than any other system. we just have to make it better in my view by having more transparency. ♪ >> osgood: coming up, the cold facts. ♪ into a scooter tha
careful with our science that we don't convict, right, people who are ultimately innocent or in the reverse, that we don't ultimately exonerate people who are indeed guilty. >> if you want to learn more go to cnn.com/justice. we have a lot of great news for you there. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. romney: "it's time to stand up to the cheaters" vo: tough on china? not mitt romney. when a flood of chinese tires threatened a thousand american jobs... it was president obama who stood up to china and protected american workers. mitt romney attacked obama's decision... said standing up to china was "bad for the nation and our workers." how can mitt romney take on the cheaters... when he's taking their side? boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events, more experiences. [ jack ] hey,
. >>shepard: doctor, never thought about that one. >> that's science for you. >>shepard: everything will be harmful soon. thank you, doctor. >> the man behind brian griffin will host the biggest event in all of hollywood, and now a new gig hosting the oscars. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in ou
unprepared we are. good to see you. hacking a computer isn't rocket science. getting to the level of the white house is noteworthy. >>guest: will, they went into the military office, that is the one responsible for keeping america's nuclear launch codes. they could compromise those, we would be in a real world of hurt. you are right, they have gotten so far. part of the reason is because attackers normally have an advantage. that element is, for years we have been afraid to acknowledge that the chinese have been behind unprecedented series of attacks not only for espionage but also to try all sorts of other things. if we are not willing to have the honest conversations with the chinese and with ourselves, of course we can't do very much to protect american networks. >>neil: but we are afraid of the chinese they own so much our debt. companies want to be often their good side and expanding to china, so, we just turn the other cheek? >>guest: we can't. this is now gotten to a whole new level. it is worrisome because of the nuclear launch codes and this is the president, the presiden
. >> reporter: but u.s. political science professor cook says the romney campaign has been playing the expectations game both ways. >> coming out the conventions until now. certainly for the romney campaign hasn't been positive and they made the argument, wait until the debates come around. >> reporter: cook says romney has an advantage by simply appearing on stage with a sitting president. and romney could take advantage as the debate makes it to the economy. voters will have their chance to decide with two more presidential debates to follow this month. in san francisco, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and you can watch that debate live right here on ktvu channel 2 this wednesday. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. followed by a special edition of ktvu news. >>> a new analysis shows a record 23.7 million latinos will be eligible to vote in the upcoming election. that is more than 20% from 2008. the hispanic research says that the turn out is usually smaller than that of whites and african americans about 50%. that could be because eligible latino voters are younger and fewe
.s. political science professor cook says the romney campaign has been playing the expectations game both ways. >> coming out the conventions until now. certainly for the romney campaign hasn't been positive and they made the argument, wait until the debates come around. >> reporter: cook says romney has an advantage by simply appearing on stage with a sitting president. and romney could take advantage as the debate makes it to the economy. voters will have their chance to decide with two more presidential debates to follow this month. in san francisco, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and you can watch that debate live right here on ktvu channel 2 this wednesday. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. followed by a special edition of ktvu news. >>> a new analysis shows a record 23.7 million latinos will be eligible to vote in the upcoming election. that is more than 20% from 2008. the hispanic research says that the turn out is usually smaller than that of whites and african americans about 50%. that could be because eligible latino voters are younger and fewer younger people vote. >>> and i
, improving how we train teachers. now i want to hire another thousand math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it particularly for manufacturing. taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close loopholes that are giving incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to give breaks to those investing in the united states. on energy, we both agree we've got to boost american production. oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. now, all of this is possible. in order for us to do it we'll have to close our deficit. one of the things tonight we'll discuss is how do we deal with our tax code and make sure we're reducing spending in a r
? that means the world has to be like 90% air. that's just science. think it's weird to collect air? you wouldn't think so if you saw what your lungs collect every time you breathe. people can make fun of me all they want, but i choose to see the glass half-full. of air. protect your health with life-saving air quality updates from the american lung association. get our free "state of the air" app at lung.org. ♪ john: in america of the welfare state grows and government takes more power. i hope that will change, but i'm not optimistic as thomas jefferson said, the natural progressive things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground. he said that years ago, and he has been proven right. what if there was a way to create a new kind of government, a more limited one that jefferson had in mind that helps poor people by freeing the free-market to work its magic. a free city not too far from the united states where americans could move. that may happen cent. a central american country recently signed an agreement with a group of investors to build a privately run city. its own police fo
defenss a littte bit.."((take po))political science analyst jonathannkreger has seen thhs beforee.((take sso))kreger:: "incumbant presidents usually on the first debate stumble a little bit and president obama is head in he polls.."((take attack might have been too - risky..((take sot))mike: "..maybe what wassmoree interesting than what was said was what wasn't ssid. the president did not utter the sot))kreger: "that was an obvious attack line and the presidenn chose not to use it.."((take sot))leland: "" don't think obama needs to talk about that because people it again - or at least ear ee about it in the next debbte.. ((takeesot))kreger: "i think what you'll ear from the obama ampaign is increased aggressiveness.."((take sot)) pellnd: "ttis is like the third innnng of a nine inning ggme..and ww have tww more of these to do..""(take vo)) in columbus - mike kallmeyer here's... our... question of the ddy.who do you think won the presidential debae debate?this is our facebook page......anddlots of peeple more than 300 of you eft comments...many of you saidd nig
years of english, three years of science, math, and social science, compared to those who didn't complete a core curriculum, those who completed the core curriculum scored 144 points higher than those who did not. when we look at those who took honors courses, they scored nearly 300 points above those who did not take honors or ap courses. rigor of the academic course load in high school leads to do better on the s.a.t. and leads students to being better prepared for college. let me give you this information in terms of framing the challenge of our country faces. for every 100 ninth graders, only 70 will graduate from high school. 44 local want to college. only 30 students will enroll in the second year of college. only 21 will graduate from a four-year institution in a six- year period of time. that is not good enough to keep the united states competitive in a global economy. we are very much focused on having high expectations for all students and doing what we can to better prepare students for college success and keep those high expectations for all students coming from all
in the name of science. i should actually enlist in that focus group. >> we could be millionaires. great -- all the food on this show. >> we would be large -- living literally. >>> first, the manhunt along the u.s./mexico border. president obama has called the family of 30-year-old border patrol agent nicholas ivy who was killed early yesterday. >> mr. obama promised that ivy's family that those responsible will be found. abc's cecilia vega reports from southern, arizona. >> reporter: it is remote, dangerous, and deadly, and it was here on this dusty stretch of land where arizona meets mexico that three border patrol agents were fired on. one made it out safely. another was shot twice and expected to recover. but the third agent, 30-year-old nicholas ivy, was shot dead. >> we suspect that this is probably some type of narcotics trafficking event. that these agents encountered. but at this time, that would be speculative. >> reporter: the three agents headed to a spot just three miles north of the border. as they headed up a desert hill, someone fired right at them in what is being descri
right on through? like in the science fiction stories. why? why does it stop? how can i make contact with the table, if this is mostly empty space and the table is mostly empty space? how many say that there is no explanation for that? there is an explanation, gang. you know what it is? oh, nobody be knowing. one be knowing. so you guys didn't have a chance to read the book this weekend. check the neighbor-- see if the neighbor knows. why is it you don't fall through your chair? anyone have any ideas? anyone? trish. do the charges repel each other? yes, electrical charges, right on, wonderful. wonderful. remember, we talked about the atom here, these electrons repelling other electrons? any electrons on your seat? yes, any electrons on your seat? and when these electrons squished closer and closer, what do they do? begin with "r" end with "l". they repel and this is an electrical repulsion, my friend, between you and the chairs upon which you sit. let's put it this way. let's suppose this table-- pretend this table is a magnet. you guys know about magnets repelling. turn around, they
and is a prize catch for the life sciences initiative. >> what are your thoughts? >> pretty exciting. there are a host of different technologies i have come in contact with over the last few years as we have been building the medical device and life sciences here, that are transformative. >> she sat down with others, hoping to use the system, which ultimately may include war injured veterans. >> when somebody tells you you're not going to be able to walk again, all you think about are the doors closing behind you. this is opening alm these doors for me. >> wow. stay with us. there's much more ahead on 11 news sunday morning. first, looking at events around town this weekend. ♪ [ female announcer ] at yoplait, we want you to feel even better about your favorite flavors. so when you call, tweet, and post, we listen. that's why yoplait light and yoplait original are now made with no high fructose corn syrup. and why we use only natural colors and natural flavors in yoplait original. so, anything else we can do for you, let us know. but you'll keep it to yogurt, right? 'cause we should
have trained more than 1,000 math and science teachers. we needed that. we want to recruit these folks to our community colleges. we know we can create two million american workers and give them the skills for the high-tech manufacturing companies in the future. there are 600,000 jobs in america in tech today. that is why we paired up with community colleges, creating thousands and thousands of decent paying jobs, but they oppose it. [applause] we are not only going to continue to provides grants and tuition for after high school education, but we are going to cut the growth of college tuition in half. [cheers and applause] we have already reduced the deficit. in four years, we will reduce it by another $1 trillion. there is an easy way to do this. we have to make some difficult decisions. we have to ask the very wealthy to pay more. ladies and gentlemen, we are going to end the war in afghanistan as we did in iraq. [cheers and applause] and in the process, over the next decade, save over $800 million. we're going to come home with that money and put half of it down to reduce the debt
in a prison fight. it nathan leopold basically will his body to science. biological tests, subjected his body to biological tests and it pulled the point. the thing that is ironic about it. the judge, the man who was the judge in that trial did not accept clarence darrow's argument. he sentenced them to life imprisonment because he was convinced in his memoirs he was convinced it would be the more cruel thing, the more cruel punishment. so clarence darrow never knew that this judge did not accept his argument. he actually made a wonderful argument against the death penalty, but the judge did not accept it. anyway. >> it is a famous argument, and it is a classic darrow argument in that it does not start at a endo disease. it starts as a end then it backtracks and wonders of them bring up in and no and be. if you talk for three days you can't go from aided be. the total impression will be lost. he had to sort of read back like of be looking for a flower. and one of the things that he consistently did in the trial, illinois had never executed teenager's in a case where they pled guilty, and so h
, that is a really great question, and that's really sort of a gun is as much political science as anything else. i think a big, a big factor is am i know, i don't want to sound too earthly about this, but the rise of computer redistricting strangely enough, that the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic or all republican. that are relatively few swing states. we've seen a bunch of change in the past couple of election, but that's very much been the exception rather than the rule. so minutes of the house of representatives fear primaries more than they fear generate elections by and large. and does they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that doesn't fully explain the senate, because you can't redistrict the senate, but it is had and he knows impact at the state, state legislature level and the more polarized politics. we have also i think the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news, everybody watched walter cronkite or huntley an
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